Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil

The Museum of Modern Art 

 February 11, 2018–June 03, 2018

Tarsila do Amaral (Brazilian, 1886–1973) is a foundational figure for the history of modernism in Latin America. The first exhibition in the United States exclusively devoted to the artist focuses on her pivotal production from the 1920s, from her earliest Parisian works, to the emblematic modernist paintings produced in Brazil, ending with her large-scale, socially driven works of the early 1930s. The exhibition features nearly 120 artworks, including paintings, drawings, sketchbooks, photographs, and other historical documents drawn from collections across Latin America, Europe, and the United States.

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Tarsila do Amaral. Abaporu, 1928. Oil on canvas. 33 7/16 x 28 3/4 in. (85 x 73 cm). Collection MALBA, Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires. © Tarsila do Amaral Licenciamentos.

Born in São Paulo at the turn of the 19th century, Tarsila―as she is affectionately known in Brazil―studied piano, sculpture, and drawing before leaving for Paris in 1920 to attend the Académie Julian. Throughout subsequent sojourns in Paris, she studied with André Lhote, Albert Gleizes, and Fernand Léger, fulfilling what she called her “military service in Cubism,” ultimately arriving at her signature painterly style of synthetic lines and sensuous volumes depicting landscapes and vernacular scenes in a rich color palette.

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Tarsila do Amaral. Urutu Viper (Urutu). 1928. Oil on canvas. 23 5/8 x 28 3/8 in. (60 x 72 cm). Coleção Gilberto Chateaubriand, Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro. © Tarsila do Amaral Licenciamentos.

The exhibition follows her journeys between France and Brazil, through Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais, charting her involvement with an increasingly international artistic community, and her role in the emergence of modernism in Brazil; in 1928, Tarsila painted Abaporu, which quickly spawned the Anthropophagous Manifesto, and became the banner for this transformative artistic movement that sought to digest external influences and produce an art for and of Brazil itself.

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Tarsila do Amaral. Anthropophagy (Antropofagia), 1929. Oil on canvas. 49 5/8 x 55 15/16 in. (126 x 142 cm). Acervo da Fundação Jose e Paulina Nemirovsky, em comodato com a Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo. © Tarsila do Amaral Licenciamentos.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art and the Art Institute of Chicago.
Organized by Luis Pérez-Oramas, former Estrellita Brodsky Curator of Latin American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, and Stephanie D’Alessandro, former Gary C. and Frances Comer Curator of International Modern Art, The Art Institute of Chicago; with Karen Grimson, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

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Tarsila do Amaral. A Negra, 1923. Oil on canvas. 39 3/8 x 32 in. (100 x 81.3 cm). Museo de Arte Contemporânea de Universidade de São Paulo. © Tarsila do Amaral Licenciamentos.

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Tarsila do Amaral. A Cuca, 1924. Oil on canvas. 23 13/16 × 28 9/16 in. (60.5 × 72.5 cm). Centre National des Arts Plastiques, Paris, France FNAC 9459. Photography © Cnap / Ville de Grenoble / Musée de Grenoble – J.L. Lacroix. © Tarsila do Amaral Licenciamentos
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Tarsila do Amaral. City (The Street). 1929. Oil on canvas. 31 7/8 × 21 1/4 in. (81 × 54 cm). Collection of Bolsa de Arte. © Tarsila do Amaral Licenciamentos
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Tarsila do Amaral. Carnival in Madureira (Carnaval em Madureira). 1924. Oil on canvas. 29 15/16 x 25 in. (76 x 63.5 cm). Acervo da Fundação José e Paulina Nemirovsky, em comodato com a Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo. © Tarsila do Amaral Licenciamentos.

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Tarsila do Amaral. Setting Sun (Sol poente), 1929. Oil on canvas. 21 1/4 x 25 9/16 in. (54 x 65 cm). Private collection, Rio de Janeiro. © Tarsila do Amaral Licenciamentos.
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Tarsila do Amaral. Postcard (Cartão-postal), 1929. Oil on canvas. 50 3/16 x 56 1/8 in. (127.5 x 142.5 cm). Private collection, Rio de Janeiro. © Tarsila do Amaral Licenciamentos.

Monday, February 19, 2018

Cagnacci: Painting Beauty and Death


The Cincinnati Art Museum is pleased to announce Cagnacci: Painting Beauty and Death on view March 23–July 22, 2018. This free special feature brings together a select group of Italian Baroque paintings for the first time: three works by Guido Cagnacci and one by Bernardo Strozzi.

Cagnacci: Painting Beauty and Death will introduce museum visitors to the seventeenth-century painter Guido Cagnacci. The centerpiece of the special feature is the oil on canvas  





Guido Cagnacci (1601–1663), Italy, The Death of Cleopatra, circa 1660–62, oil on canvas, Pinacoteca di Brera, 2341
Guido Cagnacci (1601–1663), Italy, The Death of Cleopatra, circa 1660–62, oil on canvas, Pinacoteca di Brera, 2341
 Death of Cleopatra (1660-62) on loan from the Pinacoteca de Brera (Brera Paintings Gallery) in Milan, Italy.

The special feature came about thanks to the museum’s ongoing partnership with the Foundation for Italian Art and Culture (FIAC) that brought

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Raphael’s Portrait of a Lady with a Unicorn to the Cincinnati Art Museum in 2015. FIAC facilitated the loan of the Cleopatra from the Brera, which inspired the Museum to seek complementary loans from American institutions.

Accompanying the Brera’s Cleopatra are two other paintings by Cagnacci:

The Death of Cleopatra, Guido Cagnacci (Italian, Santarcangelo di Romagna 1601–1663 Vienna), Oil on canvas

another Death of Cleopatra (1645-55), recently acquired by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York,

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and David Holding Goliath's Head (1650) from the Columbia Museum of Art in South Carolina, which has been recently conserved.

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These paintings will be joined by David with the Head of Goliath (circa 1636) by Bernardo Strozzi and an etching depicting Cleopatra made in the previous century, both from the permanent collection of the Cincinnati Art Museum.

Cagnacci: Painting Beauty and Death is curated by Dr. Peter Jonathan Bell, the Cincinnati Art Museum’s Associate Curator of European Paintings, Sculpture and Drawings. “Cagnacci is one of the great Baroque painters, but relatively unknown outside of his homeland. We have a rare opportunity to build on a very recent wave of renewed interest in this artist and exhibit these exquisite paintings together in a new dialogue with each other, including one of the Cagnacci’s acknowledged masterpieces from one of Italy’s foremost public collections,” Bell said.

Among Cagnacci’s specialties were single figure paintings made for private collectors, including the three canvases. They were made to engage with their viewers on several levels. Cagnacci presented biblical and historical figures as moral or spiritual exemplars or as cautionary tales, while their ambiguous expressions and settings, the rich colors of their clothes, the dramatic lighting and especially the realism with which the artist painted their bodies, would have offered their owners intrigue and sensual pleasure as well as edification.

This group of paintings illustrates Cagnacci’s evolving and highly individual approach to representing the fraught acts of killing and suicide. He imbued legendary sovereigns of the past, Cleopatra, ruler of Egypt, and David, future King of Israel, with surprising humanity in light of the violence and brutality of their acts.

Cagnacci was born in 1601, spent much of his life in northeastern Italy and died in Vienna in 1663. His dramatic painting style and unconventional choice of subjects paralleled a seemingly turbulent life that more than once erupted in scandal.

Bernardo Strozzi (1581-1644), a Capuchin friar, was the foremost painter in the city of Genoa in the early seventeenth century. He moved to Venice where he painted David with the Head of Goliath about a decade before Cagnacci moved to that city.

Sunday, February 18, 2018

Book: Art of the Northern Renaissance: Courts, Commerce and Devotion

In this lucid account, Stephanie Porras charts the fascinating story of art in northern Europe during the Renaissance period (c.1400–1570). She explains how artists and patrons from the regions north of the Alps – the Low Countries, France, England, Germany – responded to an era of rapid political, social, economic and religious change, while redefining the status of art. Porras discusses not only paintings by artists from Jan van Eyck to Pieter Bruegel the Elder, but also sculpture, architecture, prints, metalwork, embroidery, tapestry and armour.

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Conrad von Soest  (1370–) Blue pencil.svg wikidata:Q704984
Title
Deutsch: Passionsaltar (Wildungen-Altar)
 wikidata:Q11801539
Date
Medium tempera on wood
Dimensions 188 × 152 cm (74 × 59.8 in)


Each chapter presents works from a roughly 20-year period and also focuses on a broad thematic issue, such as the flourishing of the print industry or the mobility of Northern artists and art works. The author traces the influence of aristocratic courts as centres of artistic production and the rise of an urban merchant class, leading to the creation of new consumers and new art products. This book offers a richly illustrated narrative that allows readers to understand the progression, variety and key conceptual developments of Northern Renaissance art.

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The Arnolfini Portrait by Jan van Eyck
 
  • Laurence King Publishing Ltd. 
  • Hardback
  • 135 illustrations
  • 240 pages
  • 9½ x 6½ in
  • ISBN 9781786271655
  • Published February 2018

About the Author

Stephanie Porras is Assistant Professor of Art History at Tulane University. She has published widely on the art of the Northern Renaissance and is the author of the book Pieter Bruegel's Historical Imagination.
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Saturday, February 17, 2018

Basel Short Stories Highlights




Konrad Witz
Der heilige Christophorus, um 1435-1445



Konrad Witz
Joachim und Anna an der Goldenen Pforte, um 1437/40



Hans Baldung gen. Grien
Jugendliches Selbstbildnis, um 1502 

 

Hans Holbein d. J.
Die Heilige Familie, um 1519 




Albrecht Dürer
Bildnis des Kardinals Matthäus Lang von Wellenburg, 1518 oder nach 1520/21

 

Hans Holbein d. J.
Bildnis des Bonifacius Amerbach, 1519

 

Hans Baldung gen. Grien
Der Tod und die Frau, um 1520


 


Hans Holbein d. J.
Bildnis des schreibenden Erasmus von Rotterdam, 1523



Lucas Cranach d. Ä.
Das Urteil des Paris, 1528 




Hans Holbein d. J.
Bildnis der Frau des Künstlers mit den beiden ältesten Kindern, um 1528/29  




Jan Jansz. van de Velde III
Stillleben mit Weinglas und angeschnittener Zitrone, 1649


 

Thomas Blanchet
Die Entrückung des Philippus nach der Taufe des Kämmerers, 1663 



Georges Seurat
Femme à l’ombrelle (Frau mit Sonnenschirm), um 1884–86 



Georges Braque
Krug und Violine, 1909/1910




Egon Schiele
Bildnis Erich Lederer, 1912–1913 




Egon Schiele
Auf dem Rücken liegende Frau, 1914




Max Beckmann
Das Nizza in Frankfurt am Main, 1921

Basel Short Stories

Kunstmuseum Basel
10.02.2018–21.05.2018

https://kunstmuseumbasel.ch/de/sammlung/highlights

The exhibition Basel Short Stories turns the spotlight on the Kunstmuseum Basel's rich and in some respects world-famous collection, presenting less well-known treasures from the holdings in new contexts. The kaleidoscopic display unites illustrious and obscure, private and world-historical—and sometimes grotesque—events in the history of Basel that are brought into focus by art from the Kunstmuseum’s collections.

Basel Short Stories reminds the visitors of the extraordinary potential of the Öffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel, the municipal art collection of Basel, by staging a multifaceted dialogue between forgotten or rarely seen works and icons of the collection. It reflects all divisions of the collection, from the Old Masters to the present day, and sheds new light on the humanist Erasmus of Rotterdam,

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Hans Holbein the Younger’s masterwork The Dead Christ in the Tomb, the illustrator and naturalist Maria Sibylla Merian, the historian and art historian Jacob Burckhardt, the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, the 1912 Basel Peace Congress, the figure skaters Frick and Frack, the inventor of LSD Albert Hofmann, and the women’s rights activist Iris von Roten. Each room tells a different story while also contributing to the concert of voices that make up the exhibition.

Visual short stories unfold in nine galleries, initiated by works of art, objects, and documents from the holdings of the Kunstmuseum, the Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, and other private and public collections in Basel. Several rooms have been conceived and designed in close collaboration with Silvia Bächli, Pipilotti Rist, and Not Vital, three artists whose oeuvres are represented in the

Basel Short Stories

An accompanying catalogue published by Christoph Merian Verlag presents a wealth of materials; illustrations, quotes, and excerpts from historic documents appearing side by side with essays by experts in a variety of fields. With contributions by Andreas Beyer, Andrea Bollinger, Bodo Brinkmann, Maike Christadler, Gabriel Dette, Patrick Düblin, Søren Grammel, Anita Haldemann, Josef Helfenstein, Michael Kessler, Andrea Maihofer, Ariane Mensger, Charles Ray, Sabine Söll-Tauchert, Monica Stucky, Hortensia von Roten, Regina Wecker, Maja Wismer, and others.

The photographs of Harold Edgerton


The photographs of Harold Edgerton—a pioneer of flash technology and a largely under-recognized figure in the history of twentieth century American photography—will be on view beginning Friday, March 30 in the Whitney’s third floor Susan and John Hess Family Gallery. The works—a revelatory selection of about forty photographs shot from the 1930s through the 1960s—are drawn entirely from the Whitney’s collection, which includes 122 of Edgerton's works.

Drop of milk against red background. 
The works on view include photographs depicting single and multiple-exposure images of household products, performances, sporting events, and staged scenarios. Some of the photographs were taken in controlled environments like the bullet piercing a playing card, while others were made in public spaces requiring complex lighting and logistical coordination.


Artist
Harold Edgerton (1903-1990)
Title
Untitled (Man and violin)
Date
n.d.
Medium
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions
Sheet: 4 × 5 1/16 in. (10.2 × 12.9 cm) Image: 3 9/16 × 4 1/2 in. (9 × 11.4 cm)
Edition information
Vintage
Credit line
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Gift of The Harold and Esther Edgerton Family Foundation
Accession number
96.117.54

“Throughout his work, Edgerton ingeniously married playfulness to rational inquiry, joy to reason, and experimentation to formal innovation,” said Whitney assistant curator Carrie Springer, the organizer of the exhibition.

Artist
Harold Edgerton (1903-1990)
Title
Dennie Shute
Date
1938
Medium
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions
Image: 14 3/4 × 15 7/8 in. (37.5 × 40.3 cm) Mount (board): 24 × 19 7/8 in. (61 × 50.5 cm)
Credit line
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Gift of The Harold and Esther Edgerton Family Foundation
Accession number
96.117.27

In the early 1930s, Harold Edgerton (1903–1990), an engineer and photographer, developed flash technology that allowed him to photograph objects and events moving faster than the eye can perceive. Combining technical insight and an aesthetic sensibility, Edgerton’s photographs gave unprecedented clarity to the physical world and revealed the magic of everyday life.


Artist
Harold Edgerton (1903-1990)
Title
Flight of a Dove
Date
1934
Medium
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions
Sheet: 23 7/8 × 20 in. (60.6 × 50.8 cm) Image: 21 5/16 × 18 in. (54.1 × 45.7 cm)
Edition information
18/25
Credit line
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Gift of The Harold and Esther Edgerton Family Foundation
Accession number
96.117.78

Born in Nebraska, Edgerton learned about photography as a teenager from his uncle. His formal studies were in electrical engineering, and he earned a Doctorate of Science from MIT in 1931. It was in that year that Edgerton began to develop significant innovations for the stroboscope, electronic flash lighting equipment that he used in high-speed photography. 

Artist
Harold Edgerton (1903-1990)
Title
Untitled (Milk Drop 3)
Portfolio/Series
Drop Falling into Cup of Milk
Date
c. 1935
Medium
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions
Sheet: 14 × 10 15/16 in. (35.6 × 27.8 cm) Image: 10 5/8 × 8 in. (27 × 20.3 cm)
Edition information
Edition of 10
Credit line
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Gift of The Harold and Esther Edgerton Family Foundation
Accession number
96.117.62
A member of the MIT faculty from 1927 through 1968, Edgerton also established a business partnership to develop applications for his innovations, and was deeply engaged throughout his career in collaborating with photographers, scientists, and various organizations to develop new methods for photographing a wide range of subjects in motion. 

Deeply involved with the development of sonar and deep-sea photography, his equipment was used by Jacques Cousteau in searching for shipwrecks and the Loch Ness monster. 
Although Edgerton was uncomfortable being called an artist, his work significantly expanded the legacy of such nineteenth-century figures as Eadweard Muybridge and Thomas Eakins, and shared some of the conceptual terrain of early twentieth century movements such as Cubism and Futurism.

Friday, February 16, 2018

Book: Making the Americas Modern: Hemispheric Art 1910-1960

Making the Americas Modern: Hemispheric Art 1910-1960
This book presents an audacious account of the ways in which the arts in the Americas were modernized during the first half of the twentieth century. Rather than viewing modernization as a steady progression from one ‘ism’ to another, Edward J. Sullivan adopts a comparative approach, drawing his examples from North America, the Caribbean, Central and South America. By considering the Americas in this hemispheric sense he is able to tease out many stories of art and focus on the ways in which artists from different regions not only adapted and experimented with visual expression, but also absorbed trans-national as well as international influences. He shows how this rich diversity is most evident in the various forms of abstract art that emerged throughout the Americas and which in turn had an impact on art throughout the world.

 House over the Bridge, c.1909 - Diego Rivera

Diego Rivera - House over the Bridge, Museo Nacional de Arte (MUNAL), Mexico City, Mexico

 https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ab/The_Fourth_of_July%2C_1916_Childe_Hassam.jpg

Childe Hassam, The Fourth of July, 1916, New York Historical Society

East River from the Shelton Hotel, Georgia O'Keeffe (American, Sun Prairie, Wisconsin 1887–1986 Santa Fe, New Mexico), Oil on canvas

Georgia O'Keeffe, East River from the Shelton Hotel, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • Laurence King Publishing Ltd. 
  • Hardback
  • 140 illustrations
  • 336 pages
  • 9½ x 6½ in
  • ISBN 9781786271556
  • Published March 2018

About the Author

Edward J Sullivan is the Helen Gould Sheppard Professor of Art History at New York University. He has written numerous books and essays on 19th- and 20th-century art of the Americas and the Iberian Peninsula.